Wednesday, July 22, 2015

What's the Future of Nursing in an Aging America?

The changing demgraphics of America's aging population presents many challenges for the nursing profession. I'm indebted to Deyanara Riddix, content coordinator of Nursingschoolhub.com, for the following information. 

"For every senior over the age of 65 in the year 2000, there will be 2 by the year 2030. Today that is 1 out of every 7 people is over 65. By the year 2022, 32 percent of our workforce will be comprised of seniors over 65. The average american will live 19 or more years past their 65th birthday. 

"The 85 and older population is predicted to triple to 14.6 million by 2040. Most of the seniors’ medical needs will become the responsibility of nurses. Currently there are just more than 1.5 million Nursing Assistants, 738 thousand Licensed Practical Nurses, 2.7 million Registered Nurses, and 151 thousand Nursing Practitioners, anesthetists, and midwives with an 11% growth expected by 2022. 

"The average age of nurses is now 50 years old. From 1982 to 2008, the percentage of nurses under the age of 40 dropped from 54 percent to 29.5 percent. Aging America needs more educated nurses who are versed in some of the more technical areas, such as biometrics, robotics, and electronic records."

For a comprehensive infographic illustrating the above data, please see the following website:  Nursing School Hub

2 comments:

Amanada Johnson said...


Hopefully, we'll get more students interested in nursing. As medical technology advances, properly trained nurses will be critical towards achieving successful patient outcomes.

Robert Tell said...

It has to happen! Thanks for your comment, Amanda,